Extracting Relevant Sentences from Past Court Decisions: An Important First Step of A Legal Deep Learning Research Project - Volume 4 Number 1 (Jun. 2018) - IJKE
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General Information
    • ISSN: 2382-6185
    • Frequency: Quarterly (2015-2016); semiyearly (Since 2017)
    • DOI: 10.18178/IJKE
    • Editor-in-Chief: Prof. Chen-Huei Chou
    • Executive Editor: Ms. Nina Lee
    • Indexed by: Google Scholar, Crossref, ProQuest
    • E-mail: ijke@ejournal.net
Editor-in-chief
Prof. Chen-Huei Chou
College of Charleston, SC, USA
It is my honor to be the editor-in-chief of IJKE. I will do my best to help develop this journal better.
IJKE 2018 Vol.4(1): 17-20 ISSN: 2382-6185
doi: 10.18178/ijke.2018.4.1.094

Extracting Relevant Sentences from Past Court Decisions: An Important First Step of A Legal Deep Learning Research Project

Wai Yin Mok and Jonathan R. Mok
Abstract—This paper presents a potential solution to the problem of extracting relevant sentences from past court decisions, which is an important first step of our legal deep learning research project. Court decisions are typically written in natural language like English. Hence, our extraction solution first uses legal statutes to construct an ontology for the desired sentences, and then uses NLTK (Natural Language Toolkit), a Python Natural Language Processing Toolkit, to construct search patterns based on the ontology to extract relevant passages from hundreds or thousands of past court decisions. The extracted sentences will be further processed and the resulting information will then be fed into a deep learning system, whose purpose is to assist legal practitioners by selecting relevant documents and streamline litigation.

Index Terms—Legal deep learning research project, ontology, nltk (natural language processing toolkit), tokens, stemmer, semantic similarity, wordnet.

Wai Yin Mok is with Department of Information Systems, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama, 35899, USA (e-mail: mokw@uah.edu). Jonathan R. Mok was with School of Law, The University of Alabama Houston, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, USA (e-mail: Jon.mok@law.ua.edu).

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Cite: Wai Yin Mok and Jonathan R. Mok, "Extracting Relevant Sentences from Past Court Decisions: An Important First Step of A Legal Deep Learning Research Project," International Journal of Knowledge Engineering vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 17-20, 2018.

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